What is SASETA?

The Sexual Assault Survivors Emergency Treatment Act (410 ILCS 70/1) is an Illinois law that governs the healthcare that hospitals are required to provide to sexual assault survivors, establishes a statewide forensic evidence collection system, and creates a reimbursement program for the cost of care and evidence collection for victims who are not covered by private insurance or Medicaid.

3 Types of Hospitals & Pediatric Facilities

1. Treatment – treat all patients who present for sexual violence

2. Treatment with approved pediatric transfer – treat patients 13 years or old, transfers pediatric patients to an approved hospital (must be within reasonable distance, and offer transportation to and from presenting hospital if necessary).

3. Transfer –transfers all patients who present for sexual violence to hospital with MOU (must be within reasonable distance, and offer transportation to and from presenting hospital if necessary).

4. Approved Pediatric Facility – treats pediatric patients and can provide forensic exam

Effective Dates: JANUARY 1, 2019

• Treatment hospitals must have a signed MOU with a Rape Crisis Center.

• All treatment hospitals will submit statistical data to IDPH and it will be made public.

• Must implement a minimum of 2 hours of sexual assault training for all ER medical personnel who are not SAFE (Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner) or SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner) trained.

• All evidence will be held for a minimum of 10 years or until a youth 17 and younger turns 28 years old. JULY 1, 2019.

• All forensic exams must offer photo documentation. JULY 1, 2020.

• Deadline for all ER medical personnel who are not SAFE or SANE trained to have a minimum of 2 hours of sexual assault training. JANUARY 1, 2022.

• Forensic medical services must be provided by a qualified medical provider, as defined by SASETA (ex: SANE, SAFE, or board certified or eligible pediatric sexual abuse pediatrician).

• “Every hospital with a treatment plan approved by IDPH shall employ or contract with a qualified medical provider to initiate medical forensic services to a sexual assault survivor within 90 minutes of the patient presenting to the treatment hospital.”